Help Defeat Urban Sprawl In Our Springs Heartland

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Urban Sprawl in Florida: The Villages

The issue of urban sprawl and rampant development versus rural, agricultural areas with planned, sustainable growth will be on the agenda of the Marion County Board of County Commissioners next Tues, December 18, 2018.

Some of you will remember that the permit for AZ Ocala Ranch, a huge sprawling, monstrous, egregious development, was turned down by these commissioners in a surprise move in July of 2017.

The issue of denial of rampant development as inconsistent with the current rural way of life is of tremendous importance because it is something we face in all of North Florida, and what these commissioners do in Marion County will influence future actions in other areas.

On Tuesday, December 18, 2018 Marion County Board of County Commission will hold their Regular Meeting at the Commission Auditorium, 601 SE 25th Avenue, McPherson Governmental Complex, Ocala, Florida. The Planning & Zoning and DRC Waiver Requests is scheduled for 2 PM. At that time, the Board will hold a Public Hearing for Item 14B3, a Hearing to consider transmittal of EAR-based Comprehensive Plan Amendments to Tallahassee for review and approval.

Basically the amendments will, among other things, protect the county’s natural resources and recognize and protect its agricultural character, and discourage urban sprawl.
Therefore, if you possibly can, attend this meeting and speak to this issue, and support the amendments to the Marion County Comprehensive Plan.
Thanks to Janet Barrow for the information provided here.

Comments by OSFR historian Jim Tatum.
-A river is like a life: once taken, it cannot be brought back-


 

2 Comments

  1. Adding insult to injury (for me) is the use of my kinsman’s “AZ” (Aaron Zipperer)
    livestock brand for their proposed development. Great-uncle Aaron was also the step-son of Jacob Summerlin, the famed post-Civil War cattlemen (AKA, the “King of Crackers”) that opened the Cuban market to Florida cattle, thereby
    greatly alleviating the post-war poverty of destitute Florida farm families.

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