OSFR Goes National! One of Only 5 Groups Represented

nat'frackcall

Our Santa Fe River was one of only five groups represented in the national Americans Against Fracking conference call on Wed. Feb. 25, 2015.  President Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson spoke for Florida on this call. Other states which had a group represented were Maryland, Pennsylvania, California, and Colorado.

The call was coordinated by David Braun of Americans Against Fracking with an overview by Mark Schlosberg of Food and Water Watch.  Progress and opposition in all these areas were discussed.  It was brought out during the call that 51 percent of Americans are against increasing fracking, and of all scientists 66 percent are opposed to increases and this includes those funded by industry.

The call lasted approximately one hour and gave a national overview of the ban fracking activities and included a question period.

Following is a transcript of President Malwitz-Jipson’s offering:

mj-HEAD-SHOULDERS
President Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson

I am the President of Our Santa Fe River, and we got involved with the ban fracking movement in Florida because of Sabal Trail, a 500 mile, 36 inch, natural gas transmission pipeline, expected to come from Alabama, through Georgia to southeast Florida. If given all its required permits by the FERC, it might cut through the Florida springs heartland, our crystal clear blue natural gems that flow forth from our state’s Floridan aquifer, the same aquifer that supplies the entire state with its drinking water.  This pipeline is the infrastructure for moving fracked gas from other states throughout the US. Most of this fracked gas will be used for LNG exports popping up along the coastline of Florida.

The energy grid in the US has gotten way too extensive, consuming private lands by eminent domain for corporate greed. The grid is vulnerable and I believe, as a matter of national security, it is necessary to create energy clusters within small communities, and this can be accomplished with these types of sustainable energies, such as solar, wind and hydro.

Fracking in Florida, will it happen, it already has, in South Florida. At the end of 2013, Dan A. Hughes Company fracked 2 times, once legally and once illegally.  According to Preserve Our Paradise, on October 4th of last year, the Dan A. Hughes Company withdrew all its oil drilling applications in the western Everglades. On Friday, we were notified that they finally withdrew their last outstanding permit application from the EPA. Hughes’ retreat and the recent collapse of the fracking boom have given us a few months to recuperate after a 2014 exhausting battle.

Currently, there are no regulations against fracking in Florida and if created, they will never be enough to protect our watery resources, and thus we call for an outright ban.

OSFR, working with Food and Water Watch, Rethink Energy, Sierra Club of Florida, Florida Progressives, Stonecrab Alliance, Preserve Our Paradise, League of Woman Voters in Orange County, Soil and Water Conservation board members, and county commissioners,  has been instrumental in advocating for local county governments to sign onto a resolution that supports legislative action in the Senate and the House right now.  There are 2 bills: SB166 that simply requests a ban on fracking and HB169 that requests more specifically a ban on well stimulation that will eliminate a process necessary here for extraction of natural gas. In Florida, drillers will rely on acid stimulation to dissolve limestone to get to any of the sources of fossil fuels.

In less than one month, in North Florida we have received two confirmed resolutions from Union County and Alachua County, and we are working with more than 12 counties and this initiative is taking hold across this state.  Several elected soil and water conservation boards have also agreed to a resolution.

The Florida Medical Association has already shown their support of a ban by drafting their own resolution.  And, the biggest county in our state, Miami-Dade, as the result of a climate-change initiative, voted on a resolution to ban fracking just a few weeks ago,

We are committed to get counties to sign a resolution and make our elected officials in the Senate and the House to do what we may not be able to do with a citizen petition. We want a Frack Free Florida.

Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson

www.oursantaferiver.org

 

Continue reading here to see the entire script of the conference call:

Please share the Facebook event here!

Here is the speaker order:  (Times are in Eastern)

8:05-8:07 David intro (2 min)

 Greetings everyone, and welcome to the Americans Against Fracking National Conference call.  My name is David Braun, and we’re really thrilled to have you on the call tonight as hear some encouraging news and get some detailed accounts of the latest in the fight against fracking from communities around the contry.

Questions link:  www.bitly.com/banfrackingquestions

Sorry to mute everyone, but we wouldn’t be able to hear the stories that are going to be shared tonight if we didn’t limit the noise.  If you have feedback or thoughts about how we’re doing with these calls and you’d like to contact me, please email [email protected]

Finally, before we get going, I just want to congratulate everyone on this call and thank you for all you have done to help the movement to ban fracking.  The most recent Pew Poll demonstrates the dramatic arc of public opinion clearly turning against fracking.

In fact, public support for the increased use of fracking has declined since March 2013 which was right after the formation of Americans against fracking.  At that time, there was more support (48%) than opposition (38%) for increased fracking.  However, now those numbers have flipped, and we now are finding that the majority of Americans 51% are opposed to increased fracking while a minority of the public (39%) supports it.  This is exciting as finally an overwhelming majority of Americans don’t want to see increased fracking.

So kudos to all of you for helping to get the word out about fracking and talking with your friends, neighbors and relatives about what a terrible toxic problem it is and sharing the science around fracking.

And speaking about the science, I want to let you know that as far as scientists are concerned, us Americans Against Fracking are on the side of right as well.  Of the scientists polled, 66% are opposed to the increased use of fracking while only 31% of scientists favor it.  This is particularly noteworthy because the scientists polled include scientists whose studies are funded by industry or who have jobs in the industry.

As we all know, the truth always emerges, and we’re clearly seeing that now.

And with that, I’m excited to get the call going and start introducing our speakers.  Our first speaker is Mark Schlosberg who is the organizing director for Food and Water watch who is going to give us a national update in the fight against fracking and oil and gas infrastructure.

8:08-8:13 National overview Mark (5 min)Thank you David and friends, its an honor to be joining you all on this call. This is the first time Americans Against Fracking has gathered on one of these calls since the historic announcement about New York banning fracking and I think we should recognize at the outset again, the significance of that action and what a tremendous victory a ban in New  York is not just for New York, but for our movement nationally.

 

It is the first time a national political figure in the United States has taken action to ban fracking. It is a testament to the thousands of people across the state who made phone calls, attended rallies, collected petitions, and birddogged Governor Cuomo. The collective voice of New  Yorkers working to ban fracking elevated the science which increasingly shows fracking inherently unsafe for our water, health, communities, and climate on which we all depend. And, the national movement to ban fracking was incredibly helpful in making this happen too, from joining on national ads we organized in Iowa and North Carolina to signing on to national letters we circulated, and the rise of the movement nationally gave further voice to the science behind the health impacts and made a ban fracking position more mainstream.

 

Of course we need to stay vigilant and make sure the final language fulfills that promise, but it should be celebrated and taken as proof of what we as a movement can accomplish when we have a strong message, when we organize, and when we are persistent in holding our elected officials accountable.

The win in New York has given an important boost to folks working on the ground across the country, and you will hear from some grassroots leaders a number of states –  you will hear about the rise of two new coalitions – Pennsulvanians Against Fracking and Coloradans Against Fracking – taking the fight to the industry in heaviy fracked states. You will hear about the dynamic movement we have worked with in Maryland that is pushing a bill that would block Governor Hogan from moving forward with fracking. You will hear about efforts to protect Florida from fracking through two bills that were introduced this year. And you will hear about CA – escalating campaign on governor Brown and a number of community fights.

These are just a few states being talked about on the call, but across the country our momentum is growing.

At the same time we are making progress, we face a congress where many are openly hostile to environmental protections and an administration that has touted expanded oil and gas production through fracking.

One challenge is the push to ramp up exports of fracked gas. Two bills have been introduced in congress – one in the Senate authored by Senators Barrasso and Heinrich that would force the DOE to speed through LNG export applications in 45 days following the final environmental impact statement. Another bill in the house would do the same, but with a 30 day timeline. Americans Against Fracking organizations have been opposing both bills, and our partner Friends of the Earth has circulated sign on letters on these bills.

Neither of these bills has moved yet, but we expect the house to go first.

One point of good news on exports during the debate in the senate on the Keystone bill that President Obama thankfully vetoed, Senator Cruz offered an amendment that would have rushed approval of LNG exports to all World Trade Organization member countries. This amendment was rejected 53-45.

I also want to note two local export fights – one in Oregon at Jordan Cove and one in the North East at Port Ambrose. Several Americans Against Fracking groups have been working to oppose the Jordan Cove export facility including WaterKeeper, Environmental Action, Food & Water Watch, and others.  It had a comment period with FERC closed out recently and we are also ramping up pressure on new Governor Kate Brown to oppose LNG exports. With Port Ambrose, there is a federal comment period that closes out March 16 and several groups are generating comments both to federal regulators, and also to Governors Cuomo and Christie who could veto the project. We are also circulating a sign on letter that has over 100 groups and closes out at the end of the week to the two governors.

I want to touch on federal lands. You may recall that two year ago, Americans Against Fracking as a coalition submitted over 650,000 comments to  President Obama and the Bureau of Land Management calling for a ban on fracking on federal lands. Well, it looks like the BLM is set to finalize these rules very soon and we expect them to be very favorable to the industry. Last year Food & Water Watch worked with congressmember Mark Pocan to introduce a bill to ban fracking on all federal lands. In doing so, he was joined with Jan Schakowsky as an original co-sponsor. This year we are working with several AAF partners including Progressive Democrats of America, Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Earth and other AAF partner organizations to get more co-sponsors on this bill, which we expect to be reintroduced in the spring.

Finally, I want to mention something about the TPP. This horrible and secretive trade deal could significantly drive exports and undermine communities abilities to ban fracking. Legislation to fast track this trade agreement has not been introduced yet, but we expect it to be in the near future. We have a very real chance to stop this deal, but we need to make sure our house members know that they need to say not to frast track and the TPP.

We continue to face significant challenges at the federal level, but together we are fighting back – and working together to build power on the ground across the country. Now lets hear about some of those key grassroots efforts.

8:14-8:17 Maryland Gina (3 min)  Dr. Gina Angiola, Board Member, Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility and co-founder of Concerned Health Professionals of Maryland.

Good evening.  Thank you David and Mark for your leadership, and thank you to all who are out there fighting these critical battles in your states and local communities. I’ve been asked to provide a brief update on what we are doing here in MD, now that fracking may be imminent. As you may have heard, in November, Maryland elected a Republican Governor Larry Hogan, who has referred to fracking as a “gold-mine.” Following the election, former Governor O’Malley released regulations saying he thought fracking could be done safely.

In light of the growing body of evidence on the health and environmental impacts of fracking, and the ban in New York based on the health study, a number of groups in Maryland have come together to work to get the legislature to pass a long-term moratorium on fracking. The last two months have truly been a whirlwind of organizing activity that has brought together diverse groups who are now working together around the clock to pass an 8-year fracking moratorium in the Maryland legislature. Our legislature runs from mid-January to mid-April so it’s an intense session.

In the last two months, we’ve built a coalition of over 100 groups – health advocacy, environmental, faith and business groups, as well as local community groups– all in support of a moratorium.   Our bill was introduced in both House and Senate with 50+ cosponsors, and we held a press conference with health professionals on 2/5. We formally submitted the bills the following day.  We have hearings coming up on 3/3 and 3/11 in the Senate and House committees, so we plan to make our presence known in Annapolis on those days. We are holding a rally before the first hearing on March 3 and welcome everyone to join us there at noon on Lawyer’s Mall in Annapolis.  Simultaneously, we have active media efforts around every major milestone.  Some of the larger groups in our coalition are using their e-mail lists to send letters to legislators, and we are gathering petitions from all across the state.

It has been truly inspiring to see this effort as groups are all bringing whatever resources and skills they can contribute, including individual volunteers who have organized sign-on letters from businesses and health professionals, highlighting the focal points of our messaging:  fracking is bad for public health and bad for Maryland’s economy.

To elevate the public health message, we even formed a separate group called Concerned Health Professionals of MD, inspired by Concerned Health Professionals of NY. Their first task was drafting and circulating a health professional sign-on letter to the leadership of the General Assembly, outlining the public health risks and calling for a moratorium.  This letter was delivered at the press conference announcing the moratorium bill.

So for us, the race is on.  Two months ago, no one thought a moratorium was possible.  Now it’s a top agenda item in the legislature and Maryland citizens are fired up.  Hopefully we’ll have some great news to share on a future call!

8:18-8:21 Pennsylvania Karen (3 min)  Founder of Berks Gas Truth and founding steering committee member of PAF

Thanks, David!

Seems like a long time since I did a Pennsylvania update on one of these calls. The last time I did an update, Tom Corbett was still governor. The last time I did an update, Pennsylvanians Against Fracking didn’t exist. Wow! What a difference a few months makes!

I’m thrilled for the chance to catch everyone up on some exciting developments in our state.

It’s true, Tom Corporate is gone, but we’ve just replaced him with a different Tom Corporate, otherwise known as Tom Wolf. The only difference between Republicans and Democrats in Pennsylvania when it comes to fracking is that Republicans want to give our natural resources away, Democrats want to sell them. Pennsylvania is the only state that doesn’t have a severance tax on drilling. Tom Wolf’s Campaign for a Fresh Start was nothing more than a reiteration of his mentor Ed Rendell’s plan to impose a severance tax comparable to the one in West Virginia. You might remember that Ed Rendell is the one who interceded on behalf of Range Resources to get the EPA to end its investigation into water contamination in Parker County, Texas. Rendell could not be more enthusiastic about drilling, and so it came as no surprise that his protégé Wolf would follow suit. He campaigned on levying a severance tax to pay for education. In one of his campaign ads set in a classroom, he told schoolchildren that, quote,  “the money we need to fund your schools lies right underneath your seats.” Wolf even surrounded himself with natural gas cheerleaders from the Rendell days, like Katie McGinty and John Hanger, both pro-fracking DEP chiefs under Rendell. And, yes, Hanger’s the one who walked out on Josh Fox in Gasland.

Wolf neglected to tell the school kids in that ad that the stuff under their seats had also poisoned about 250 water wells, wells that kids just like them rely on for clean drinking water in some cases. We know that the number of contaminated wells the DEP admits to is much lower than the true number. Nevertheless, it was a revelation that was announced the same day a scathing report on the DEP was issued by the state’s Auditor General who called the agency “woefully unprepared” to deal with the fracking boom. Those two stories seemed to set in motion a series of news stories exposing DEP’s failures. And our problems extend beyond the DEP to the Department of Health. Staffers there were given a list of buzzwords with verbal instructions to avoid callers using them. Fracking, Marcellus, hair falling out, skin rash were just some of the buzzwords.

With a pretty dire situation on the ground and the certainty that whoever won the gubernatorial election was going to be pro-fracking, a group of organizations joined together over the summer to launch Pennsylvanians Against Fracking. In our first six months, we’ve grown a coalition of about 100 member organizations, institutions, and businesses, several faith leaders, and many more individual supporters. The members of our steering committee include Food & Water Watch, Marcellus Protest, Marcellus Outreach Butler, the Pennsylvania Alliance for Clean Water and Air, the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, PennEnvironment, and Berks Gas Truth.

We rallied in Harrisburg two weeks after the election with the theme of Cleaning Harrisburg of Dirty Energy Money. Then, on January 20th, we rallied at the Governor’s inauguration. People watching tv told me later that they could hear the chants of Ban Fracking Now throughout the ceremony.

It was the kick off of a bird-dogging campaign we’re calling Hounding Wolf. When Wolf visited a school in the Pittsburgh area to promote his severance tax last week, Pennsylvanians Against Fracking was there. And we plan to be there next week when he gives his first budget address and at many, many events after that.

We definitely have a fight ahead of us, but Wolf told the press a few days ago that the alternative to a severance tax is not no tax, it’s no drilling, like in New York. When the ban in New York was announced, Governor-Elect Wolf called the ban unfortunate. What a difference a couple of months and a bird dogging campaign can make!

Before I close, I need to share one bit of breaking news with you! Philadelphia was recently selected to host the Democratic National Convention in July of 2016. Yes, the Democrats are heading to the state that is fracking’s ground zero! And so Americans Against Fracking will be there, heading up a huge rally and march in Philadelphia. It’s the perfect opportunity to bring national attention to the fracking crisis happening in this state and so many others. Stay tuned for much more!!

Back to you, David!

8:22-8:25 California Joe (3 min) Joe Galliani has been the Organizer of South Bay Los Angeles 350 Climate Action Group since 2009 and has been the Chair of South Bay Clean Power since June of 2014.

In the City of Carson – The grassroots citizens group, the Carson

Coalition, with significant help from Food & Water Watch, had an

unexpected victory on January 26 when Oxy Oil announced they were

pulling the plug on their 200 plus well project first proposed in 2012.

Oxy said their project, “is no longer practical in the current commodity

price environment.” Oxy originally reported the project would involve

fracking to get more oil production out of the Dominguez Oil Field,

where more than 600 wells have been drilled since the 1920s, but

later reversed course and vowed not to frack in Carson. The Carson

Coalition, led by Diane Thomas, (who spoke in Oakland earlier this

month) kept the pressure on even after the Carson City Council

overturned their moratorium on fracking last May. The Carson

Coalition continues to press for a ban on fracking and recently held an

event featuring Calvin Tillman, former mayor of Dish Texas – who left

town over fracking. The March 3 election in Carson will determine the

makeup of the City Council.

 

In the City of Hermosa Beach Measure O is the only item on the

March 3 ballot. It will determine whether the city maintains its ban on

oil drilling in place since the 1930s or if it will approve E&B’s project to

drill 30 slant wells and 4 waste water injection wells in what is now the

Maintenance yard of this 1.3 square mile beach town. For the past 2

years the grassroots citizen’s group, “Stop Hermosa Beach Oil – Keep

Hermosa Hermosa” has waged a fierce campaign covering the city

with banners, signs and creative events involving the music, art,

surfing, business, environmental, professional sports, and civic

communities. For the past several months door-to-door canvasing,

phone banking, direct mail, social media and advertising campaigns

specifically on the Measure O vote have been driven by Keep

Hermosa Hermosa with key collaboration from Surfrider Foundation

and Heal the Bay and strong support from Food & Water Watch and

the South Bay 350 Climate Action Group. We believe that Measure O

will lose and that the ban on oil drilling will be maintained.

 

In La Habra Heights, Measure A is on the March 3 ballot and if passed

would ban the drilling of any new oil and gas wells, halt the

reactivation of old wells and bar certain treatments to enhance oil or

gas drilling, including fracking. Oil companies have spent nearly

$400,000 on the campaign through their political action committee.

Heights Oil Watch, the grassroots citizens group who gathered the

signatures to place Measure A on the ballot, has spent about $28,000.

Food and Water Watch has been working with Heights Oil Watch and

walking precincts and phone banking. The measure will not affect

existing oil drilling in the community. It will only ban what the initiative

calls “high-intensity petroleum operations,” such as fracking,

acidization and steam injection.”

 

On the clean energy front, a community choice aggregation (CCA)

initiative involving the 16 cities of the South Bay of Los Angeles, has

had the first 6 cities pass resolutions to participate in its feasibility

study. The initiative is based on Marin Clean Energy’s successful CCA

which offers its customers lower rates than PG&E, the investor owned

utility, while delivering a minimum of 50% renewable energy verses

22% from PG&E. California CCA programs emphasize local

generated clean energy which drive local jobs and local investments.

Other CCAs are in development throughout the State. The County of

Los Angeles is looking at the South Bay program as the core of a

potential county wide CCA effort.

 

8:26-8:29 Colorado Kaye (3 min)

 

As growing scientific evidence continues to tie hydraulic fracturing to negative health, property and environmental impacts, concerned people from across Colorado have joined together to redouble efforts to protect Coloradans from this extreme gas and oil extraction method. Yesterday, people representing a broad base of businesses, health, community, environmental, faith, youth and social justice organizations gathered in Denver to launch “Coloradans Against Fracking,” a coalition highlighting the failure of Governor John Hickenlooper’s oil and gas task force to produce legislative recommendations that will protect Coloradans from fracking.

 

Partners in the coalition of Coloradans Against Fracking are too numerous to mention all, but included are Our Longmont,  Our Broomfield, Frack Free Colorado, Protect Our Loveland, 350 Colorado, Boulder County Citizens for Community Rights, Colorado Progressive Coalition and Food & Water Watch.

 

A scientific analysis of more than 400 peer-reviewed studies on the health impacts associated with fracking compelled New York Governor Andrew Cuomo last December to ban fracking in New York State.  Coloradans Against Fracking call on the Governor to do the same and to use his executive authority to issue a statewide ban on fracking.

 

As the top public servant in Colorado, Governor Hickenlooper is accountable to Coloradans, not oil and gas corporations.  To this point, Governor Hickenlooper has failed to grasp  this fundamental and essential duty.  It is Governor Hickenlooper’s job to put our health, our environment, our future, and our constitutionally guaranteed human rights above the obscene profits of his Big Oil and Gas donors and supporters.  It is his job to ban fracking in Colorado once and for all.

 

As leaders elsewhere have stood up against fracking and Coloradans have taken action to protect their own communities, not only has Governor John Hickenlooper declined to protect the people of this state from the dangerous and extreme extraction method, but he has sued communities that have taken it upon themselves to protect their families, friends, homes, parks and open space.  Over the past two years, communities all over Colorado have taken a stand for their right to protect their community from fracking and have won at the ballot box.  Longmont, Lafayette, Fort Collins , Boulder and Broomfield have built the people power needed to say NO to fracking.

 

Very recently communities within Denver organized under the banner of “Don’t Frack Denver” in order raise the profile of fracking intentions in their community and to educate about toxic fracking and galvanize those living in Colorado’s capital city.

 

It is time to take this message statewide.  While a statewide ballot measure is not anticipated at this time, all options remain on the table should Governor Hickenlooper and Colorado’s General Assembly fail to provide honest and genuine protection for the citizens of Colorado.  We neither want window dressing that pretends that the disconnect with our legislative leaders and Hickenlooper’s administration has been resolved.  Nor do we want to hear disingenuous words of pretend concern for our welfare from the oil and gas industry, who in truth wants carte blanche to drill whenever, wherever and however they please.

 

To prevent constitutional amendments from appearing on the November 2014 ballot, last August Governor Hickenlooper, assorted politicians and the oil and gas industry struck a political backroom deal with a consolation price that created a task force to allegedly resolve conflicts involving oil and gas extraction.  Even in his appointments, Governor Hickenlooper has failed Coloradans by stacking the task force with oil and gas insiders  but with NO representatives with public health expertise and with NO representatives from the five Colorado communities that either banned this toxic and dangerous extraction method or placed long-term moratoriums that would remain in place until further studies on the health and safety impacts are completed.

 

This oil and gas task force is set to finalize legislative proposals and deliver them to Governor Hickenlooper by the end of this week.  Unfortunately, we expect that the task force will propose to move forward with business as usual — or worse — adding to the existing 52,000 active wells in Colorado with even more of them next to our homes, schools, places of employment and public parks and recreation areas.

 

Coloradans Against Fracking calls on Governor Hickenlooper to heed the science, listen to the people of Colorado and ban fracking in our glorious Mile Hi State.

 

 

8:30-8:33 Florida Merrillee (3 min)  Merrillee Malwitz-Jipson as been a active leader throughout Florida, disseminating information from various statewide organizations with one another in an attempted to create a focused goal of preserving the State’s culturally significant watery heritage.

 

 

I am the President of Our Santa Fe River, and we got involved with the ban fracking movement in Florida because of Sabal Trail, a 500 mile, 36 inch, natural gas transmission pipeline, expected to come from Alabama, through Georgia to southeast Florida. If given all it’s required permits by the FERC, it might cut through the Florida springs heartland, our crystal clear blue natural gems that flow forth from our state’s Floridan aquifer, the same aquifer that supplies the entire state with it’s drinking water.  This pipeline is the infrastructure for moving fracked gas from other states throughout the US. Most of this fracked gas will be used for LNG exports popping up along the coastline of FLA.

The energy grid in the US has gotten way too extensive, consuming private lands by eminent domain for corporate greed. The grid is vulnerable and I believe as a matter of national security it is necessary to create energy clusters within small communities, it can be accomplished with these types of sustainable energies, such as solar, wind and hydro.

Fracking in Florida, will it happen, it already has, in South Florida. At the end of 2013, Dan A. Hughes Company fracked 2 times, once legally and once illegally.  And, news from Preserve Our Paradise: on October 4th of last year, the Dan A. Hughes Company withdrew all its oil drilling applications in the western Everglades. On Friday, we were notified that they finally withdrew their last outstanding permit application from the EPA. Hughes’ retreat and the recent collapse of the fracking boom have given us a few months to recuperate after 2014 exhausting battle.

Presently there are no regulations to frack in Florida and if created, they will never be enough to protect our watery resources,  so we call for an outright ban.

OSFR, working with Food and Water Watch, Rethink Energy, Sierra Club of Florida, Florida Progressives, Stonecrab Alliance, Preserve Our Paradise, League of Woman Voters in Orange County, soil and water conservation board members and county commissioners  have been instrumental in advocating for local county governments to sign onto a resolution that supports legislative action in the Senate and the House right now.  There are 2 bills: SB166 that simply requests a ban on fracking and HB169 that requests more specifically a ban on well stimulation that will eliminate a process necessary here for extraction for natural gas. In Florida, drillers will rely on acid stimulation to dissolve limestone to get to any of the sources of fossil fuels.

In less than one month, In North Florida we have received 2 confirmed resolutions from Union County and Alachua County, we are working with more than 12 counties and this initiative is taking hold across this state.

Several elected soil and water conservation boards have also agreed to a resolution.

The Florida Medical Association has already shown their support of a ban by drafting their own resolution.

And, the biggest county in our state, Miami-Dade, as the result of a climate change initiative, v oted on a resolution to ban fracking just a few weeks ago,

We are committed to get counties to sign a resolution and make our elected officials in the Senate and the House to do what we may not be able to do with a citizen petition. We want a Frack Free Florida.
8:34-8:36 Next steps Mark (2 min)
8:37-8:50 Questions

 

 

 

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