Please Donate to Help Fight Bottled Water

Dear Merrillee ,

The Michigan Citizens for Water Conservation (MCWC) has been battling corporate giant Nestlé for nine long years, but the group is running out of money and time.

Can you make an urgently needed donation to help the MCWC raise the $10,000 necessary to counter Nestlé’s deep pockets?

Nestlé, which is the world’s largest food and beverage corporation, has spent a fortune in legal battles over the years so that it can continue to pump water from Michigan streams and keep profiting at the expense of the environment.

This fight isn’t just about Michigan- Nestlé’s approach there is indicative of its attidude about control of water resources, and a loss in Michigan will surely encourage it to continue its practices elsewhere. Six years ago, a judge ordered Nestlé to stop its extraction of 400 gallons per minute from a Michigan wildlife preserve because the pumping had a negative impact on local streams and ponds. Rather than cease the pumping, Nestlé appealed the decision, and has kept the MCWC tied up ever since.

Now the MCWC has only a few days to secure the money needed to appear at a court hearing this Monday, July 6th. If the group can’t make the hearing, it may have to drop the case.

MCWC and its 2000 members have funded this lengthy fight by having bake sales, raffles, and garage sales. But now they face defeat, simply because Nestlé has been able to outspend them.

Click here to make sure the MCWC’s hard work hasn’t been in vain.

Your entire contribution will go to the MCWC, and Food & Water Watch will update you on the outcome of this extremely important matter.

Thank you for your support.

Sincerely,
Wenonah Hauter
Executive Director
Food & Water Watch

Food & Water Watch, a nonprofit consumer organization based in Washington, D.C., works to ensure clean water and safe food in the United States and around the world. We challenge the corporate control and abuse of our food and water resources by empowering people to take action and transforming the public consciousness about what we eat and drink. For more information, visit www.foodandwaterwatch.org.

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